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Off-Flavor – Diacetyl

Diacetyl [pronounced dahy-uh–seet-l] is a common off-flavor in homebrew that presents itself in the aroma and flavor as butter, butterscotch or liquid butter (think movie theater popcorn) or in the mouthfeel of the beer as slickness.  The threshold for diacetyl is extremely low at around 0.5 parts per million in lighter beers such as american and international lagers.  What is diacetyl, how is it produced, and how can we stop…

Your Homebrew Sucks - Part 3

Your Homebrew SUCKS – Part 3

So after reading Part 1 about why it is essential to do an evaluation and Part 2 about some resources that can help you out, Part 3 of Your Homebrew Sucks is all about how to actually evaluate a beer.  There’s a lot of ways to go about evaluating a homebrew, this approach is on the more critical side of things because we need to really know what this beer…

Your Homebrew Sucks - Part 2

Your Homebrew SUCKS – Part 2

So this is the second part of the series on Your Homebrew Sucks.  If you haven’t read the first article yet, you should check it out first.  Assuming that you’ve read the first part, let’s get into Your Homebrew Sucks – Part 2. How do we actually evaluate a beer?  This is something that a lot of people actually struggle with and the people who claim that they do this…

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Brewing Local – Book Review

Brewing Local: American-Grown Beer is one of those books that every homebrewer should have in their library. The concept behind the book is relatively simple but the inspiration that it provides can keep someone with “brewer’s block” going strong. Through 340 pages divided into four sections, Hieronymus provides a detailed history on American beer, gets in depth on possible ingredients and finishes with a list of 22 recipes that are sure…

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Your Homebrew SUCKS – Part 1

Your homebrew sucks.  Ok so it may not actually suck, but it can always be better.  A lot of people make good homebrew, very few people make truly great homebrew.  The difference between those two groups of people is not the ingredients they are using, the recipe that they’ve crafted or the cost of their brewhouse.  The difference between those two people: the good homebrewer drinks while the great homebrewer…

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Homebrew All-Stars – Book Review

Homebrew All-Stars By Drew Beechum and Denny Conn All-stars are the best of the best, they are the elite in their particular fields.  So how do you find an all-star in the world of homebrewing? Denny Conn and Drew Beechum have scoured the nation looking for brewers who are stand outs in four different fields of homebrewing; The Old-School Masters, The Scientists (and Process Nerds), The Wild Ones, and The Recipe…

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Grim’s Porter

The porter is one of those styles of beer that I think every homebrew should have dialed in.  From the humble porter, small adjustments can be made to create other styles of beer.  Want something a little more hearty, a touch of roast barley and some more 2 row will give you a stout.  Want something reminiscent of a campfire, smoked porter here we come with just a little bit…

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Pukwudgie Pale Ale

American Pale Ales (BJCP 2015 – Style 18B) are a huge category of beers these days.  They are the precursor for IPAs and all of the other super hoppy beers out there.  A pale ale can be a gateway into the world of craft beer for a lot of people, for some it may be a touch too bitter but for most it’s not.  This recipe is a proven winner,…

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Buggane Imperial Brown Ale

American Brown Ales (BJCP 2015 – Style 19C) are one of those styles that seem to be disappearing from the craft beer world.  People clamber to the IPAs, Double IPAs, Triple IPAs and Bourbon Barrel Aged beers but pass on the intricate yet approachable brown ale.  It’s a sad thing too because these beers can be amazing and really flavorful.  Recipe, process and my own BJCP scoresheet are included below…

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Naming your homebrewery?

Why name your homebrewery?  It doesn’t mean anything and in reality you and only your close friends will most likely be the only people who will ever know it.  That being said, it’s something that most homebrewers do, myself included.  The reason that I named my homebrew company is because it lets you feel like a pro brewer.  More than that, it’s just plain fun.  There is nothing better than…